Voidships

A Steampunk History of a World at War

Other steampunk

Leslie Orton posted a status

Steampunk Writers and Artists Guild - July 27, 2014 - 6:36pm
Leslie Orton posted a status
"In the next edition of The Aether Chronicle: Professor of Eugenics Stabbed with Fountain Pen!"
Categories: Other steampunk

Elizabeth Schechter posted a status

Steampunk Writers and Artists Guild - July 25, 2014 - 4:06pm
Elizabeth Schechter posted a status
"Elated to announced that my novel House of Sable Locks has WON the 9th annual Passionate Plume award from the Romance Writers of America!!!"
Categories: Other steampunk

Jack Tyler posted a status

Steampunk Writers and Artists Guild - July 23, 2014 - 6:45pm
Jack Tyler posted a status
""Mankind was not headed to hell; it was the devil and was home already." from The Volcano Lady by T.E. MacArthur""
Categories: Other steampunk

Jack Tyler posted a blog post

Steampunk Writers and Artists Guild - July 21, 2014 - 7:27pm
Jack Tyler posted a blog post
Storm Clouds Gathering     The e-mail read:Today we are excited to introduce Kindle Unlimited--a new subscription service for readers in the U.S. and a new revenue opportunity for authors enrolled in KDP Select.  With Kindle Unlimited, customers will be able to read as many book as they want from a library of over 600,000 titles.  KDP authors and publishers who enroll their books with U.S. rights in KDP Select are automatically enrolled in Kindle Unlimited.  Inclusion in Kindle Unlimited can help drive discovery of your book, and when your book is accessed and read past 10% you will earn a share of the KDP Select global fund.  For the month of July we have added $800,000 to the KDP Select global fund bringing the total to $2 million.  KDP Select is an optional program that makes your book exclusive to Kindle and eligible for the following benefits: Reach more readers – With each 90-day enrollment period, your book will appear in Kindle Unlimited in the U.S. and the Kindle Owners' Lending Library (KOLL) in the U.S, U.K., Germany, France, and Japan which can help readers discover your book. Earn more money – When your book is selected and read past 10% from Kindle Unlimited or borrowed from KOLL, you'll earn your share of the monthly KDP Select Global Fund.  You can also earn a 70% royalty for sales to customers in Japan, Brazil, India, and Mexico.Maximize your sales potential – Choose from two promotional tools including: Kindle Countdown Deals, time-bound promotional discounts for your book, available on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk, while earning royalties; or Free Book Promotion, where readers can get your book free for a limited time.  Learn more about KDP Select and Kindle Unlimited.  Visit your Bookshelf to enroll your titles in KDP Select, and click on "Manage Benefits" to get started.        As an author, I frequent a number of sites that exist to provide various services to authors, and I have to tell you, they have been abuzz since this came out.  I'm assuming that every author who has a book for sale on amazon.com got one, and the general consensus is that this is the first bell tolling for the death of literature.  I don't take quite that fatalistic a view of it, but it's bad.  In The Wisdom of Crowds, James Surowiecki discourses on the subject of how the larger the number of people estimating an outcome, the closer to being absolutely accurate it approaches, and I have yet to see one person writing about the great boon this is going to be for writers...  Or readers, for that matter.        When I was trying unsuccessfully to publish my work through the traditional channels, I found myself a resident in the worst possible time to be trying to break into the business.  There used to be hundreds (thousands?) of small-to-medium houses that were willing to take on an unknown author and give him a limited print run.  If his book did well, the next one could be expected to be bigger.  I compare it to major league baseball, where a kid can join a single-A club and work his way as high in the organization as his skills will allow.  I was trying to break in at a time when all of these publishing companies were buying each other faster than you buy TV dinners, and right at that time, there were Disney, Time-Warner, and another that I can't remember right now.  Returning to my baseball analogy, imagine baseball with no farm system.  If you didn't walk out of high school or college ready to run A-Rod back to the bench, you weren't playing.        Then came self-publishing and print-on-demand.  Through this back door I got into the game, and I have that in common with more and better-known authors than you might think.  The vast majority of us never achieve more than a few score, or at best, a few hundred sales, but occasionally someone will break out of the pack and become one of those huge celebrity-authors you see on the late-night talk shows and the Manhattan party circuit.  It's a dream all of us have.         Print-on-demand has opened the door to anyone who wants to write a book in any field.  There are sites that, for little or no money, will let you load your book as a file into their computer.  Whenever someone orders it, the computer prints out one copy and mails it to them.  The cost of the book covers the cost of printing and mailing, with some left over for profit, which the house and the author share.  It is a good system that has empowered many an author who would never have seen print otherwise, due to the fact that the publisher incurs no risk.  If no one ever orders your book, the house never incurs a cost.        But now our friends at amazon.com want to charge the consumer a $9.99 per month subscription fee in exchange for which the subscriber can read any book he wants during that month.  Sounds great for the consumer, but let's crunch some numbers.  My book is listed at $8.99.  Amazon discounts it to $8.09.  When someone buys a copy, after all the costs are paid and my publisher takes his profit, I am left with a royalty of about $2.00.  If I'm a high-on-the-midlist author selling 1,000 copies a month (I'm not), that's a nice supplement to my income, but how are multiple authors going to be paid out of that money pool at a rate that will support them, no matter how many books they "sell?"  The e-mail says there is $2,000,000 in the pool.  That sounds like a big number to those of us who live paycheck to paycheck, but I happen to know that there are at least 5,500,000 books for sale on Amazon.  I know this, because my book was briefly ranked that low.  There could be millions more for all I know, but assuming mine was dead last, divide 2 mil by 5.5 mil, and you'll find that each book earns 36 cents for its author.  Sell 1,000 books a month at that rate, and you might make enough to cover your new tax bracket.        Music and movies, two other mass entertainment genres, have gone to streaming long ago, and despite the frantic outcries of naysayers, both industries are still robust and making profits for those who create content.  But I question the ability of book publishing to follow in their footsteps.  Look at those numbers again.  What I see this killing is the professional author, the one who makes enough money through book sales to concentrate on his craft and become both more prolific and more skilled.  Look, corporations like amazon.com (especially amazon.com) exist primarily to harvest all the money in the world, but they may have found a way to shoot themselves in the foot this time.  How many more Stephen Kings and J.K. Rowlings can we expect to see in the future when the only way anyone can afford to write is on their lunch break at work, or in stolen moments after the kids are asleep?  This may be a great deal for purchasers of literature, but my crystal ball suggests that it is going to destroy that class of people who have traditionally produced that literature.  Will there still be good writers?  Of course there will, but they will be farther between and harder to find.  I foresee a day not far off when readers will be able to acquire all the drivel they can consume for peanuts.  I have no idea who originated the saying, "You get what you pay for," but I think we are about to be treated to yet another demonstration of that old saying's accuracy.See More
Categories: Other steampunk

Dieselpunk Shakespeare: Richard III (1995)

Dieselpunk - July 20, 2014 - 6:52pm
It’s difficult to overstate the importance of Shakespeare’s plays and poetry. In 1995, Sir Ian McKellen took Shakespeare’s play Richard III and reimagined it into a powerful dieselpunk play and movie.
In the dieselpunk play and movie, the setting of Richard III is changed from Britain of the 1480s to Britain of the 1930s. The film combines a wide variety of uniforms and weapons to create a yet very believable alternate universe. Early in the film, the uniforms and equipment are largely British however, they do at times still have a Soviet element (note the helmets of the soldiers at the train station when the young princes arrive). As the film progresses, and Richard rises to power, the uniforms turn more and more fascist until it achieves a full SS appearance.


The acting of Ian McKellen is extraordinary in this movie. Deliciously evil is the term that comes to mind whenever I watch it. Rickard III has a powerful cast including Annette Bening as Queen Elizabeth, Jim Broadbent as Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, Robert Downey, Jr. as Rivers, Kristin Scott Thomas as Lady Anne Neville and Maggie Smith as The Duchess of York. The acting, direction and cinematography are superb.



The overall effect makes Richard III into an extraordinary movie. Roger Ebert included it in his list of Great Movies and described it as “perversely entertaining.”

I highly recommend Ian McKellen’s ‘Richard III’.

To read a great dieselpunk review of Richard III check out this article by Cap’n Tony at Dieselpunks.org.
Categories: Other steampunk

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